Turon: Banana Lumpia

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Turon: Banana Lumpia by Kirsten Acosta
Story and photos by Nick Canedo

While appetizers and the main course is savory, what people remember most about a three-course meal is the last thing to hit their tongue—the dessert! For St. Mary’s senior biology major Kirsten Acosta, there is not dessert better than one that comes from her Filipino roots.

While cooking is a hobby, Acosta’s true passion is dentistry.

“I’ve always been fascinated with teeth. When choosing a college, I didn’t want to leave my San Antonio, since it’s always been my home. When I found out St. Mary’s could put me on the track to dental school, I knew this place would be a good fit,” Acosta says.

Living at home while attending college, Acosta enjoys the home cooked dinner she gets after a long day at school.

“While I love the Mexican food that San Antonio has to offer, my favorite will always be Filipino because it’s my heritage.”

Acosta’s family has a tradition of the entire household contributing to dinner once they become teenagers. When she first started helping her family, she had a tough time meeting her parent’s cooking standards.

“At first, both my mother and father would yell at me that something wasn’t right. I was discouraged at first, but I wanted to be like the rest of my family and cook traditional Filipino dishes,” she says.

The first dish Acosta made by herself for her family was turon, a popular Filipino desert.

“My mom said it was the easiest thing to make, so she trusted me to do it.”

Also known as banana lumpia, turon is a popular street food among Filipinos.

“We used to eat it by itself, but it was my idea to eat it with ice cream. Now, turon and vanilla ice cream is pretty much the tradition for deserts in my household,” Acosta says.

Ingredients

For 10 turons:

  • Five bananans
  • Bowl full of water
  • ½ c of golden brown sugar
  • ½ c of white sugar
  • 10 spring roll wrappings
  • Paper towel
  • Plate

Directions
Create quarter long bananas by cutting them in half, then cutting them lengthwise. Dip each one in water, then mix a little golden brown sugar and white sugar together and sprinkle over top wet bananas. Wrap two quarter long bananas in each spring roll wrapping, then tap some water on spring roll and sprinkle sugar mixture over top (this will create “clean” but sugary tops).  Deep-fry the wrappings until golden and transfer to paper towel on a plate to absorb oil.

Basic Omelete

Basic Omelete by Tim Paiz
Videography and Production by Nick Canedo

Tim Paiz, a senior international business major and golfer on the men’s team at St. Mary’s University, discusses breakfast and demonstrates how to make a simple dish to start the day—an omelete.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

• 2 eggs
• 2 Tbsp. whole milk
• 2 Tbsp clarified butter or whole butter
• Salt and ground white pepper, to taste
• Any additional fillings the cook desires

Directions

Crack the eggs into a glass mixing bowl and beat them until they turn a pale yellow color. Heat a heavy-bottomed nonstick sauté pan over medium-low heat. Add the butter and let it melt. Add the milk to the eggs and season to taste with salt and white pepper. Then, grab your whisk and whisk like crazy. beating as much air as possible into the eggs. When the butter in the pan is hot enough to make a drop of water hiss, pour in the eggs, but don’t stir. Let the eggs cook for up to a minute or until the bottom starts to set. With a heat-resistant rubber spatula, gently push one edge of the egg into the center of the pan, while tilting the pan to allow the still liquid egg to flow in underneath. Repeat with the other edges, until there’s no liquid left. Your eggs should now resemble a bright yellow pancake, which should easily slide around on the nonstick surface. If it sticks at all, loosen it with your spatula. Gently flip the egg pancake over, using your spatula to ease it over if necessary. Cook for another few seconds, or until there is no uncooked egg left. If you’re adding any other fillings, now’s the time to do it. Spoon your filling across the center of the egg in straight line. With your spatula, lift one edge of the egg and fold it across and over, so that the edges line up. Cook for another minute or so, but don’t overcook or allow the egg to turn brown. If necessary, you can flip the entire omelete over to cook the top for 30 seconds or so. Just don’t let it get brown. Gently transfer the finished omelete to a plate. Garnish with chopped fresh herbs if desired.